LANSDOWNE

SYMPHONY

ORCHESTRA

Tchaikovsky The Tempest Program Notes

Tchaikovsky’s  reading  of  Shakespeare’s  final,  and  most  mysterious  play,  led  to  this  Fantasy-Overture,  perhaps  a  deeper  work  than  the  more  popular  Romeo  &  Juliet.    It  presents  the  major  characters  and  themes  programmatically,  and  also  suggests  the  moral  ambiguity  of  nature.  Prospero,  the  Duke  of  Milan,  had  been  distracted  by  the  study  of  arts,  sciences  and  magic,  leading  to  a  surprise  coup  at  the  hands  of  his  brother,  Antonio.  Now  Prospero  and  Miranda  (his  daughter)  live  on  an  enchanted  island  somewhere  in  the  Mediterranean  Sea.  With  magical  powers,  Prospero  has  tamed  the  island,  controlling  its  subjects,  including  the  spirit  Ariel  and  the  deformed  half-monster,  Caliban.  Opening  the  tone  poem,  Tchaikovsky  ingeniously  depicts  the  ship,  sailing  on  theMediterranean,  with  King  Alonso  of  Naples  and  his  royal  party.  It  includes  Antonio  (now  Duke  of  Milan),  and  Prince  Ferdinand,  Alonso’s  son  and  a  highly  eligible  bachelor.    The  passengers’  nobility  is  portrayed  by  a  heraldic  melody  in  the  brass,  an  idea  found  elsewhere  in  the  piece.  Prospero,  sensing  his  brother’s  nearness,  summons  a  storm,  sinking  the  ship  and  bringing  the  travelers  to  the  island.    (Musically,  the  storm  is  filled  with  tritones,  which  in  Russian  music  denote  supernatural  intervention-  another  good  example  is  Stravinsky’s  Firebird.)After  the  storm  dies  down,  the  play’s  characters  have  been  separated  across  the  island,  and  believe  the  others  drowned.  Tchaikovsky  introduces  the  beautiful  melody  of  love,  in  the  cellos,  for  Miranda  (and  later,  Ferdinand).  The  spirit  Ariel  and  half-monster  Caliban  are  a  study  in  contrasts,  in  both  Shakespeare’s  play  and  Tchaikovsky’s  tone  poem.    Ariel’s  music  is  sprightly  and  light  -  it’s  Ariel  who  sings  Dzwhere  the  bee  sucks,  there  suck  I,  in  a  cowslip’s  bell  I  liedz.    Caliban’s  music  is  loud,  angular,  and  angry  -  it  was  his  island  before  Prospero  arrived  and  he’s  now  enslaved.  Ferdinand  and  Miranda  fall  in  love,  the  plotters  who’d  overthrown  Prospero  beg  forgiveness,  and  the  comedy  act  of  the  drunkards  Trinculo,  Stephano  and  their  misplaced  faith  in  Caliban  concludes  with  predictable  failure.  Everything  resolved,  the  expanded  royal  party  boards  the  ship  (sea-worthy:  the  storm  was  magical),  and  they  leave  for  Italy.    Caliban  is  left  to  his  own  devices  on  the  island,  and  Ariel  is  set  free.  The  Tempest  is  likely  Shakespeare’s  last  play,  and  he  probably  performed  the  role  of  Prospero  himself.    Like  a  playwright,  Prospero  has  controlled  the  actors  and  their  movement  through  the  play,  and  also  like  a  playwright,  his  power  comes  to  an  end  at  the  play’s  conclusion.    Prospero  recognizes  that  as  duke,  he  will  have  to  concentrate  on  governing,  instead  of  his  precious  books.  

 

He  tells  the  audience:  

Now  my  charms  are  all  o'erthrown,  

And  what  strength  I  have’s  mine  own,  

Which  is  most  faint.  Now,  ’tis  true,  

I  must  be  here  confined  by  you,  

Or  sent  to  Naples.  Let  me  not,  

Since  I  have  my  dukedom  got  

And  pardoned  the  deceiver,  dwell  

In  this  bare  island  by  your  spell,  

But  release  me  from  my  bands  

With  the  help  of  your  good  hands.  
Gentle  breath  of  yours  my  sails  

Must  fill,  or  else  my  project  fails,  

Which  was  to  please.  Now  I  want  

Spirits  to  enforce,  art  to  enchant,  

And  my  ending  is  despair,  

Unless  I  be  relieved  by  prayer,  

Which  pierces  so  that  it  assaults  

Mercy  itself  and  frees  all  faults.  

As  you  from  crimes  would  pardoned  be,  

Let  your  indulgence  set  me  free.  

 

In  Tchaikovsky’s  music,  a  transformation  occurs.    While  most  of  the  piece  employs  key  signatures  such  as  F  minor  (four  flats)  and  even  G-flat  major  (six  flats!),  here  it  settles  in  C  major  (no  flats  or  sharps,  the  key  of  a  blank  slate),  as  if  starting  anew,  before  progressing  naturally  into  F  minor,  returning  to  the  music  of  the  ship.  As  it  sails  into  the  distance,  the  F  minor  tonality  fades  away,  abandoning  questions  of  major  or  minor,  until  all  that  remains  is  a  solitary  note.    Nature  has  reclaimed  the  island.