LANSDOWNE

SYMPHONY

ORCHESTRA

Berlioz Symphony Fantastique Program Notes

Born:  December  11,  1803,  La  Côte-Saint-André,  France.    Died:  March  8,  1869,  Paris,  France.  

 

As  a  young  composer,  virtually  unknown  outside  the  music  field,  Hector  Berlioz  fell  head-over-heels  in  love  with  the  Irish  actress  Harriet  Smithson,  who  he  had  never  met.    He  wrote  her  impassioned  letters,  and  finally  composed  this  symphony.    Requesting  that  his  program  notes  accompany  performances  of  the  work,  we  include  them  here:  A  young  musician  of  morbid  sensitivity  and  ardent  imagination  poisons  himself  with  opium  in  a  moment  of  despair  caused  by  frustrated  love.  The  dose  of  narcotic,  while  too  weak  to  cause  his  death,  plunges  him  into  a  heavy  sleep  accompanied  by  the  strangest  of  visions,  in  which  his  experiences,  feelings  and  memories  are  translated  in  his  feverish  brain  into  musical  thoughts  and  images.  His  beloved  becomes  for  him  a  melody  and  like  an  idée  fixe,  which  he  meets  and  hears  everywhere.  

 

I.  Daydreams,  passions  He  remembers  first  the  uneasiness  of  spirit,  the  indefinable  passion,  the  melancholy,  the  aimless  joys  he  felt  even  before  seeing  his  beloved;  then  the  explosive  love  she  suddenly  inspired  in  him,  his  delirious  anguish,  his  fits  of  jealous  fury,  his  returns  of  tenderness,  his  religious  consolations.  

 

II.  A  ball  He  meets  again  his  beloved  in  a  ball  during  a  glittering  fête.  

 

III.  Scene  in  the  countryside  One  summer  evening  in  the  countryside  he  hears  two  shepherds  dialoguing  with  their  ǮRanz  des  vaches;  this  pastoral  duet,  the  setting,  the  gentle  rustling  of  the  trees  in  the  light  wind,  some  causes  for  hope  that  he  has  recently  conceived,  all  conspire  to  restore  to  his  heart  an  unaccustomed  feeling  of  calm  and  to  give  to  his  thoughts  a  happier  coloring;  but  she  reappears,  he  feels  a  pang  of  anguish,  and  painful  thoughts  disturb  him:  what  if  she  betrayed  him...One  of  the  shepherds  resumes  his  simple  melody,  the  other  one  no  longer  answers.  The  sun  sets...  distant  sound  of  thunder...  solitude...  silence...

 

IV.  March  to  the  scaffold  He  dreams  that  he  has  killed  his  beloved,  that  he  is  condemned  to  death  and  led  to  execution.  The  procession  advances  to  the  sound  of  a  march  that  is  sometimes  somber  and  wild,  and  sometimes  brilliant  and  solemn,  in  which  a  dull  sound  of heavy  footsteps  follows  without  transition  the  loudest  outbursts.  At  the  end,  the  idée  fixe  reappears  for  a  moment  like  a  final  thought  of  love  interrupted  by  the  fatal  blow.

 

V.  Dream  of  a  witches  sabbath  He  sees  himself  at  a  witches  sabbath,  in  the  midst  of  a  hideous  gathering  of  shades,  sorcerers  and  monsters  of  every  kind  who  have  come  together  for  his  funeral.  Strange  sounds,  groans,  outbursts  of  laughter;  distant  shouts  which  seem  to  be  answered  by  more  shouts.  The  beloved  melody  appears  once  more,  but  has  now  lost  its  noble  and  shy  character;  it  is  now  no  more  than  a  vulgar  dance-tune,  trivial  and  grotesque:  it  is  she  who  is  coming  to  the  sabbath...  Roars  of  delight  at  her  arrival...She  joins  the  diabolical  orgy...  The  funeral  knell  tolls,  burlesque  parody  of  the  Dies  Irae.